The Difference Between Employees and Entrepreneurs

The thought has probably crossed everybody’s mind at one point or another. How do I get rich quick? It is perhaps not very politically correct at the moment, but quite frankly, even in a global recession there are many people who continue to earn a substantial amount of money every. There are even some who are willing to share their secrets so that you too can become a millionaire – for a small fee of course. But really, this is what sets entrepreneurs apart and how they do it.

I meet lots of people, from students to new graduates to senior directors of companies to entrepreneurs. I have also been picking up on what people think they need to succeed or be wealthy. Bear in mind, there are also people pursuing altruistic endeavours for not-for-profit organisations and social enterprises. I will exclude from this discussion because they are driven by something other than a financial motivation. So that leaves the “get rich” crowd. Some hope to win the lottery, others want to meet a millionaire that will help finance their dreams. These opportunities could yield success, but they are difficult to get a hold of, requiring some luck or requiring a huge investment of time and resources developing a product or service, preparing a business plan, and most importantly bearing some risk. If you look carefully around you, however, there is another method that exposes you to less risk, yet can yield an infinite amount of returns.

 

The working world can be divided into three categories in its simplest sense – 1) those with a lot of money or capital or have access to a large market than can generate such capital; 2) those whose only resource at their immediate disposal is time and therefore must produce, provide a service, or in other words be employed; and 3) the brokers, people who forge relationships between those with good exposure to a market or capital and those that produce or provide a service and take commissions for those relationships. Many people are stuck in category #2, devoting all their time and energy working, but barely accumulating any significant level of wealth. They are trying to get to category #1, where you put your capital work, it earns a return, and you’re making money out of money. The key to getting from #2 to #1 is the category of brokers, middlemen, salespeople, and many entrepreneurs.

 

The trick to succeeding as a broker is to find a producer with good product or service, but who has limited access to market. The other part of the equation is having access to funders or knowing the groups with channels to market that need good products to sell. Does this still sound challenging and difficult? Well, some producers and service providers have been doing this successfully for years by creating their product or service, packaging it up, and putting it in a form that can be sold or marketed in high volumes – think about software producers, book writers, coaching seminars, and franchises to name a few. By doing this you start to move from #2 to #3. This is becoming even more prevalent with the use of technology, the world wide web, and social media. The opportunities are abound, now it’s up to you to find your target market, package up your product or service, and tell the world about it.